'England's oldest home' could be yours to rent for £6,000 a month

Stunning Kent manor house which is ‘England’s oldest home’ and was once inhabited by William the Conqueror’s brother, boasts five bedrooms, a swimming pool and its very own minstrels’ gallery – could be yours to rent for £6,000 a month

  • Luddesdown Court, near Gravesend in Kent, is worth £2.45million and available to rent for £6,000 a month
  • The 1,000-year-old Grade I listed manor boasts a claim to being the oldest house in England
  • It had been occupied by Odo, also known as the Earl of Kent, who was William the Conqueror’s half-brother

The ‘oldest house in England’ which was once owned by William the Conqueror’s half-brother and is worth £2.45million is now available to rent for £6,000 a month.

Luddesdown Court, near Gravesend in Kent, has an array of striking features, including a Tudor chimney, a Norman corbelled fireplace, exposed beams, and exquisite stonework. 

The 1,000-year-old Grade I listed manor boasts a claim to being the oldest house in England, having been described in 1931 by Knight Frank’s Arthur J. Burrows as ‘the oldest court lodge in Kent’ and ‘presumably one of the most ancient continuously inhabited domestic buildings in the kingdom’.

It had been occupied by Odo of Bayeux, also known as the Earl of Kent, who is best known for likely commissioning the Bayeux Tapestry which depicted the 1066 Norman conquest of England – which he had participated in with his half-brother William. 

The five-bedroom country estate, which boasts its own minstrels’ gallery – a form of balcony often used for private dining – was last on the market in November 2019 when it sold for £2.45million, according to independent property valuations company, The Move Market. 

It is now back on the rental market with estate agent, Savills, for an eye-watering guide price of £6,000 per month.

The ‘oldest house in England’ which was once owned by William the Conqueror’s half-brother and is worth £2.45million is now available to rent for £6,000 a month

The 1,000-year-old Grade I listed manor boasts a claim to being the oldest house in England, having been described in 1931 by Knight Frank’s Arthur J. Burrows as ‘the oldest court lodge in Kent’ and ‘presumably one of the most ancient continuously inhabited domestic buildings in the kingdom’. From the end of the expansive, vaulted room lies a staircase leading to a Minstrels gallery – a form of balcony which is often used for private dining.

Luddesdown Court, near Gravesend in Kent, has an array of striking features, including a Tudor chimney, a Norman corbelled fireplace, exposed beams, and exquisite stonework

A spokesperson for Savills said: ‘Thought to date back to around the 1000 to 1100s, this exceptional Grade I listed home boasts an immense history as well as many original and historic features.

‘A very striking and substantial property, this flint and stone built home also benefits from spectacular, far-reaching views across the lush Kent countryside.’

The property boasts a lavish great hall on the first floor, supported by historic oak beams, and with five large windows to let in the natural light.

Potential buyers will also be able to see unique murals scratched into the plaster of the walls.

From the end of the expansive, vaulted room lies a staircase leading to a Minstrels gallery – a form of balcony which is often used for private dining.

Multiple reception rooms can be accessed from the manor’s entrance hall, as well as a well-equipped kitchen, ground floor storeroom, cellar, generously proportioned study, and a guest cloakroom.

The five-bedroom country estate, which boasts its own minstrels’ gallery – a form of balcony often used for private dining – was last on the market in November 2019 when it sold for £2.45million, according to independent property valuations company, The Move Market

It is now back on the rental market with estate agent, Savills, for an eye-watering guide price of £6,000 per month

The property boasts a lavish great hall on the first floor, supported by historic oak beams, and with five large windows to let in the natural light

Potential buyers will also be able to see unique murals scratched into the plaster of the walls

A 1000-year-old manor house which belonged to William the Conqueror’s treacherous half-brother is available for rent

Each of the property’s five bedrooms are located on the first floor of the countryside house – complimented by a family bathroom.

The exterior of the property is also a sight to behold – located on green-belt land in the North Downs, the manor house has both a walled garden and remembrance garden, sporting alcoves, built-in benches, and a sunken pond. 

And beyond the 23 acres of formal gardens there is a well-kept rose garden and an established orchard with a small paddock.

The property also houses an impressive pool complex with a 3,000 square foot indoor swimming pool, his and hers changing rooms, a second kitchen, a sauna and further outbuildings with workshop and storage space.

Odo of Bayeux: The half-brother of William the Conqueror who ruled England in his absence and likely commissioned the Bayeux Tapestry 

It is believed that Odo commissioned the Bayeux Tapestry, which depicts the Norman Conquest of England, for his cathedral in 1077 (pictured: Odo depicted on the tapestry) 

Odo of Bayeux, also known as the Earl of Kent, was born circa 1036 the son of minor lord Herluin of Conteville.

His mother was Arlette, who had once been the mistress of Duke Robert I of Normandy – the father of William the Conquerer.

William went on to make Odo, his half-brother, the bishop of Bayeux in 1049.

Odo then went on to assist William in the Norman invasion of Britain in 1066, fighting in the battle of Hastings.

Following their victory, he was made Earl of Kent in 1067 and tasked with guarding the south east of England.

During William’s absences from the country, Odo ruled with two other men.

It is believed that Odo commissioned the Bayeux Tapestry, which depicts the Norman Conquest of England, for his cathedral in 1077.

In 1082 William imprisoned him on a charge of raising troops without royal permission, possibly to defend the pope against Henry IV, the Holy Roman Emperor.

Upon the accession of William II in 1087, Odo was released, despite having rebelled against him in support of the Duke of Normandy and William’s brother, Robert Curthouse.

The revolt was put down, but Odo was still allowed to become Robert’s aide.

Odo played an active role in organising the First Crusade and would die in Palermo in 1097 while on his way to the Holy Land.

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