Dido Harding claims Test & Trace 'didn't predict' demand surge

Test and Trace boss Baroness Dido Harding claims it is ‘not my job’ to predict when the system will get overloaded and claims she didn’t foresee new school year crippling the struggling regime

England’s Test & Trace chief Dido Harding today said nobody in the organisation was able to predict that demand for coronavirus tests would surge when schools went back.

Lady Harding, who is the chair of the testing and tracing system, blamed the start of the new school year for demand ‘significantly outstripping’ test capacity.

September saw huge backlogs in the testing system across the country, with hundreds complaining they were unable to book tests anywhere near their homes and availability having to be throttled so labs could process the tests that were done.

In a meeting with MPs this morning, Lady Harding admitted the ‘balance between supply and the demand forecast wasn’t right’.

And when pressed on when the next peak in demand for tests might be, the testing chief repeatedly refused to answer the question and said it wasn’t her job to predict it.

Angry MPs insisted it was and that it was her job to plan for how the system would cope when it came.

Dr Susan Hopkins, the chief medical adviser to Test & Trace, said there would be sustained pressure on the test system over winter and that the system would need to be capable of more than the 500,000 per day that officials currently claim it can do. 

Baroness Dido Harding, chief of NHS Test & Trace, appeared in front of MPs on the Health and Social Care and Science and Technology committees this morning

Carol Monaghan, the SNP MP for Glasgow North West, asked Lady Harding when she anticipated the next large demand for testing would be.

‘You might want to ask Dr Susan Hopkins for her view,’ Lady Harding said, ‘because in the end, this is about a view on where we think the disease will progress.’

Chair of the meeting, Greg Clark, interrupted, asking for Lady Harding’s view, and Ms Monaghan also pushed back, saying: ‘It’s about planning – it’s about planning how we’re going to tackle it as well.’

When pressed by Mr Clark, the testing chief tried to deflect the question again: ‘My view is that we need to keep expanding testing capacity significantly and substantially.’

The meeting chair pushed again and Lady Harding said: ‘Honestly, I defer to the clinical experts on that, rather than think of it as my job to know the answer to that question.’

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