11:00 UK weather news LIVE: Scorching 26C THIS WEEK and Indian summer on its way as Polar Plunge lifts – LATEST

SCORCHING temperatures of 26C are expected THIS WEEK as an Indian summer is on its way.

It comes after yesterday's chilly Bank Holiday Monday which saw freezing temperatures, the Met Office has said.

Temperatures are set to remain in the teens across the country and could struggle to reach double figures in parts.

The sudden cold spell will descend because of a 500 mile-wide freak "polar plunge"

In some areas temperatures plunged to zero overnight.

The mercury dropped to just 0.6c in Ravensworth, North Yorkshire last night.

It comes as Brits are could be set to bask in 26C sun at the end of the week, as hot air pushes up from the continent.

Follow our weather live blog for all the latest news and updates…

 

  • WARM NIGHT TONIGHT ACROSS BRITAIN

    High pressure, which is dominating at the moment, will weaken and make sunny spells light and patchy as we go into Tuesday night.

    Tonight is not going to be as cold as last night – and tomorrow, bursts of rain from the Atlantic will move from the west to east of the UK.

  • CLOUDS TO BUILD AND SPREAD TODAY

    BBC Weather's Carole Kirkwood has said that clouds will “build and spread out” across the UK today – but nonetheless there will be some sunny spells.

    Highs of 20C will be seen in the south of England today, with 15C in the Scottish Highlands.

  • BRITS HIT THE TOWN – DESPITE FREEZING TEMPERATURES

    Boozy Brits made the most of the long Bank Holiday weekend by hitting the town again last night – despite the cold weather

    With nightclubs still shut, revellers toasted the end of the celebratory bank holiday by hitting packed pubs and bars across the UK.

  • STORM AIDEN: FIRST ON THE NEW LIST

    Storm Aiden will be the first cyclone to batter the UK this winter as the Met Office releases its full list of storm names for the coming year. 

    Bella, Darcy, Gavin, Saidhbhin and Wilson are just some of the other storm names picked by the Met Office for next year's dangerous weather.

    For five years, the most serious storms have been named to help keep Brits safe and raise awareness of severe weather before it hits. 

    Storms are given names when they are likely to trigger amber or red weather warning and cause devastation across the country. 

    This year, the Met Office asked the public to send in their ideas for names and were flooded with suggestions. 

  • 22C EXPECTED IN THE SOUTH ON FRIDAY

    Mr Finnis said: “Some uncertainty later in the week how quickly weather fronts will clear away.

    “But it looks like a trailing cold front across southern areas will bring cloudier skies and some occasional patchy rain on Thursday and Friday.

    “While northern areas will be brighter and breezier but with some blustery showers passing through.”

    “Thursday maybe the warmest day of the week in the south, perhaps reaching 20-22C here before the front clears later on Friday, high teens elsewhere.”

  • ATLANTIC HEAT TO SCORCH BRITAIN AS TEMPS ROCKET

    Britain will see a return to hot weather as temperatures rocket back up into the 20s this week.

    Nick Finnis at Netweather has forecasted highs of 22C in the south by Friday.

  • STORM NAMES FOR 2020-21 RELEASED

    The Met Office has released the names they will use for storms in 2020-21.

    Is your name on the list?

    • Aiden
    • Bella
    • Christoph
    • Darcy
    • Evert
    • Fleur
    • Gavin
    • Heulwen
    • Iain
    • Julia
    • Klaas
    • Lilah
    • Minne
    • Naia
    • Oscar
    • Phoebe
    • Ravi
    • Saidhbhín
    • Tobias
    • Veronica
    • Wilson

    EMPTY BOURNEMOUTH BEACH YESTERDAY

    TEMPS HIT ZERO OVER BANK HOLIDAY WEEKEND

    Brits have shivered through one of the coldest late August bank holidays on record after temperatures plunged to ZERO in some areas overnight.

    But the so-called 'polar plunge' hasn't stopped hardy staycationers from making the most of their long weekend.

    The mercury dropped to just 0.6c in Ravensworth, North Yorkshire on Sunday night.

    CAMPERS LINE UP IN LYME REGIS

    Campers were spotted in glowing tents last night as the sun went down over Lyme Regis in Dorset.

    A RED MOON RISES

    This is the moon behind St Mary's Lighthouse in Whitley Bay, Northumberland, tonight.

    HERE'S WHAT TO EXPECT TONIGHT

    According to the Met office, most places in the UK will be dry and cool with variable amounts of cloud and some clear spells.

    The odd light shower is possible in the far southeast, whilst northwestern parts can expect clouding with some rain later.

    EARLY SEPTEMBER LIKELY TO BE A WASH OUT

    The week ahead is expected to be warm but very wet in some places as a weather front arrives off the Atlantic this evening, hammering the North West with up to 42mm of rain by Thursday.

    The rest of the week is expected to remain warm, in the mid teens for most of the UK.

    REVELLERS HIT THE STREETS FOR NOTTING HILL IN SPITE OF PATCHY WEATHER

    Notting Hill Carnival was packed today as revellers went out in spite of coronavirus and the rain.

    BEAUTIFUL SUNSET OVER LONDON AND THE REST OF THE UK

    A couple has just been pictured walking across Westminster Bridge as the sun sets beside Big Ben.

    Today's sunset will officially be at 7.48pm, according to timeanddate.com.

    Tonight will see the moon 98 per cent full.

    WHAT TO EXPECT IN THE COMING DAYS

    SWIMMERS BRAVE THE CHILLY WATER TO JUMP OFF DURDLE DOOR

    Swimmers were seen braving the chilly waters off Durdle Door in Dorset earlier.

    Dorset had a patchy but broadly sunny day, with highs of 17 degrees this afternoon.

    TODAY WAS THE COLDEST START TO AN AUGUST BANK HOLIDAY IN 40 YEARS

    England had the coldest start to an August bank holiday in 40 years.

    Ravensworth, North Yorkshire, woke up to a wintery 0.6C this morning, the second coldest start to a summer bank holiday since 1983.

    US SOYBEAN CROPS UNDER THREAT FROM BAD WEATHER

    The US soybeans hit their highest prices in more than two years on Monday as dry weather in parts of the U.S. Midwest is expected to damage the condition of crops, analysts said.

    Traders are keeping a close eye on U.S. weather ahead of the autumn harvest amid concerns about drought in the key state of Iowa. Rains were disappointing during the weekend, and this week's forecast looks too dry, traders said.

    Rain could still help later-planted crops, especially soybeans, Reuters reports.

    “Weekend rains in U.S. farm belts disappointed and there is concern that the condition of U.S. crops has deteriorated,” said Matt Ammermann, StoneX commodity risk manager.

    LAST DAY OF SUMMER BRINGS CHILL WITH AUTUMN ON ITS WAY

    Temperatures plunged to just above freezing on the last day of summer as the UK heralded the coming of autumn with a chill in the air.

    Meteorological summer ends on August 31, with autumn beginning in September.

    Looking ahead to the first days of September, Met Office forecaster Craig Snell said: “It will be pretty seasonal this week.

    “Temperatures will be roughly where we expect them by day, and at night there will still be some chillier nights.

    “I imagine if people are going out late evening or early morning there certainly will be a chill in the air and they probably will need at least a lightweight jacket to take that chill off.”

    COOL EVENING AHEAD

    As the last evening of summer draws to a close, temperatures will hover in the low teens across the country.

    SUMMER ENDS TODAY

    Brits made the most of the last day of Summer today as people paddle boarded and kayaked.

    Others were seen punting on the River Cam in Cambridge on a sunny but cold Bank Holiday Monday.

    MOSCOW HEATWAVE AS UK FREEZES

    Temperatures reached 28-30C on the last day of summer in the Russian capital.

    WET SUMMER “CURSE”

    August was 61 per cent wetter than average at 124mm in England and Wales, as the month bordered on the top 20 wettest Augusts since records began 254 years ago in 1766, Met Office figures showed.

    It was the wettest August for 16 years, since 2004's 157mm.

    Summer was around 25 per cent wetter than normal, with UK summer rainfall bordering on topping 325mm, which would make it the wettest summer since 2009 bar 2012's 378mm.

    The wet summer was blamed on April being so hot.

    The Weather Outlook forecaster Brian Gaze said: “Summer was hit by the curse of hot spring weather, which often sees wet summers follow. It's weather's way evening things out. It's been a disappointing summer.”

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