Woman gets pregnant with TRIPLETS while taking the contraceptive pill

Woman reveals she’ll be raising TRIPLETS as a single mother after falling pregnant despite taking the Pill ‘every morning’ and says the babies’ dad is no longer in the picture

  • Amy Maxey, 28, from Rushton, Northamptonshire, is expecting triplets
  • She did pregnancy test after feeling ‘sick and tired’ and went for scan at 6 weeks
  • Amy was told by nurses that she was expecting triplets and she was ‘shocked’
  • She said she was taking the contraceptive pill every morning at the time  

A woman has revealed how she fell pregnant with triplets despite taking the Pill ‘every day’. 

Amy Maxey, 28, from Rushton, Northamptonshire, explained she was shocked to discover she was pregnant and was dealt another surprise when she learned there were three babies. 

The first-time mother, who works at AutoGlass BodyRepair, said she is already concerned about how she will afford childcare for three babies. The triplets’ father is not involved. 

Amy Maxey, 28, from Rushton, Northamptonshire, explained she was shocked to discover she was pregnant and was dealt another surprise when she learned there were three babies 

Amy, who lives with her younger sister, explained she had been taking her contraceptive Pill ‘in the morning every day, as soon as I opened my eyes’ 

Amy, who lives with her younger sister, explained she had been taking her contraceptive Pill ‘in the morning every day, as soon as I opened my eyes’.

She was shocked to discover she was expecting when she took a pregnancy test after feeling ‘really sick and tired’. 

She began feeling even more drained, sleeping for between 12 and 14 hours a day, and booked herself in for a private scan at six weeks pregnant. 

It was then she was told she was expecting triplets. 

‘The first lady said there were two [babies] and she has to get another nurse to come in and check and then that one said there was three,’ Amy said. 

‘I don’t know how to describe it. I was literally like, “what the hell, that’s mad”. Obviously I was worried at the same time but yeah, just very shocked. That’s the only thing I can describe it as.’

Amy was warned it was unusually for triplets to make it to 12 weeks and was told at least one of the babies might not survive. 

Amy began feeling even more drained, sleeping for between 12 and 14 hours a day, and booked herself in for a private scan at six weeks pregnant. 

At her six week scan, one nurse told Amy she was expecting twins, before another nurse saw three embryos on the ultrasound. Two of the triplets are identical and share a placenta, while the other triplet is non-identical

After the scan, Amy began to feel more energised and ‘stopped being tired’. 

She suspected this might be because at least one of the babies hadn’t developed but all three babies were still looking healthy at the 12 week scan. 

Amy is hoping to return to work ‘at least three days a week’ after her triplets are born, but said she doesn’t think she is ‘going to be able to afford childcare for three’. 

She said that she will be raising the babies alone as the father is not involved, and her step-mother has said that she will have the babies three days a week while Amy is working. 

Two of the triplets are identical and Amy plans to name them Ocean and Harlow, while the other triplet, who is non-identical, will be called Ivy-Gray.

Amy, who has scans every two weeks, said that she was told that her babies are ‘really healthy, especially for triplets at this stage’, and will name her daughters Ivy-Gray, Harlow and Ocean

Amy, who has scans every two weeks, said that she was told that her babies are ‘really healthy, especially for triplets at this stage’. 

She added: ‘The next two weeks are pretty critical because by 28 weeks they could come pretty much any time so it’s like looking after myself now and just making sure I get as much rest as possible.’ 

The best outcome, Amy said, is if the babies arrive when she is between 32 and 34 weeks pregnant. 

She said: ‘Beforehand it’ll still be okay, it’ll just be they’ll be very small.’  

How effective is the contraceptive pill? 

The combined pill contains artificial versions of female hormones oestrogen and progesterone. 

When taken correctly, it is more than 99 per cent effective at preventing pregnancy, meaning fewer than 1 in 100 who use it as contraception will get pregnant in 1 year. 

People are advised they need to take it around the same time every day as you could get pregnant if you do not do this. 

Pregnancy could also occur if you miss a pill, or vomit, or have severe diarrhoea while some medications may make it less effective. 

The standard way to take the pill is to take one every day for 21 days and then have a break for seven days, during which you have a bleed like a period, and then start again. 

Some types of pill with no or shorter breaks (a tailored regime) which may reduce some side effects. 

The pill prevents pregnancy by preventing the ovaries from releasing an egg each month. 

It also thickens the mucus in the neck of the womb, so it is harder for sperm to penetrate the womb and reach an egg, and thins the lining of the womb so there is less chance of a fertilised egg implanting into the womb and being able to grow. 

There are other methods of contraception which are better are preventing pregnancy, such as the intrauterine device (IUD), intrauterine system (IUS), the injection and the implant. 

 

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