The Bad Skin Clinic: Woman has 'kidney-shaped' keloid removed from ear

Woman travels 6, 000 miles to have the two-year-old ‘gunky and gooey kidney-shaped’ keloid removed from behind her left ear in The Bad Skin Clinic

  • Jenny, from Caribbean island of St. Martin, has ‘kidney-shaped’ keloid on her ear
  • Travels 6,000 miles to London to seek help with problem plagued her two years
  • Journalist will appear on tonight’s episode of Quest Red’s The Bad Skin Clinic 

A woman whose massive ‘kidney-shaped’ keloid behind her ear has plagued her for more than two years has it removed in The Bad Skin Clinic. 

Tonight’s episode of Quest Red’s The Bad Skin Clinic features journalist Jenny, who travels a whopping 6,000 miles from the Caribbean island of St. Martin to London to seek help with a problem with the lumpy keloid which dangles from her left ear. 

‘I’ve had it now for about two years and it’s been growing, and growing, and growing’ she admits. 

‘It’s really itchy and uncomfortable, gunky and gooey. I actually feel blood pulsating through it. It’s just gross!’ 

Jenny, from the Caribbean island of St. Martin, travels to London to seek help with a problem that has plagued her for over two years – the ‘kidney-shaped’ keloid on her ear (pictured)

The journalist says the keloid is ;really itchy and uncomfortable, gunky and gooey’ and she actually feels ‘blood pulsating through it.’ Pictured, during her procedure 

Despite the impact the keloid has had on her life, Jenny remains upbeat, and even reveals that her boyfriend has a special name for her keloid. 

‘My boyfriend calls it Jenny 2.0. It’s actually got to the stage now where it’s more like Jenny 9.0 because it’s so massive!’ 

Jenny’s keloid is so enormous and awkwardly positioned on her ear, that it has even started impacting her hearing. 

‘I have some concerns about my hearing, I’m not getting the same amount of sound in that I used to because I do think the position of my ear canal has changed because of this distorting it,’ she says. ‘I’m working as a journalist, when I am out with my cameraman making stories, I do have to think about my keloid.’ 

Jenny’s keloid (pictured) is so enormous and awkwardly positioned on her ear, that it has even started impacting her hearing

Despite the impact the keloid has had on her life, Jenny (pictured) remains upbeat, and even reveals that her boyfriend has a special name for her keloid

‘Oh my God! It’s massive,’ a wide-eyed Jenny says, seeing the dismembered lump held in front of her (pictured)

WHAT ARE KELOIDS?

Keloids are types of scars that occur when they become larger than the original wound.

This can be due to minor skin damage, such as acne, and can spread out of the original area and persist for many years.

Keloids affect around 11 million people around the world every year.

A tendency to develop keloids can run in families.

They look like exaggerated scars and are raised above the skin. 

Keloids are shiny and hairless, and can feel hard and rubbery, as well as domed. 

New ones are often red or purple before turning browner as people age.

Most sufferers have just one or two keloids, however, some have many, particularly if they are the result of acne or chickenpox.

Keloids can often not be cured as cutting one out may cause it to be replaced by a larger scar in the same place.

 Source: British Skin Foundation

Enough is enough for Jenny, who wants to get her confidence back on track by visiting Dermatological Surgeon Dr Emma Craythorne at her Harley Street Clinic to see if she can have her keloid removed. 

Getting full view of the keloid for the first time, Dr Emma can scarcely believe the size of it.

‘Whoa! It looks like a love heart!’ she gasps. ‘Whoa on two different levels here. Whoa for the 6,000 miles and whoa for the keloid.’ 

Talking things over, Jenny gives Dr Emma a sense of how much the lump has grown in a short space of time. 

‘She started like a pea size about two years ago, and now she’s got to this size,’ she explains.

Devising a strategy to rid Jenny of her keloid, Dr Emma explains how she will remove the keloid via a short procedure before referring Jenny to a Radiotherapist for a follow up appointment, to ensure the keloid doesn’t return. 

Before going under the knife, Jenny asks Dr Emma if she takes the gold medal for the biggest keloid she’s ever seen. 

‘Well I’ve seen a few in my time, Jenny,’ Emma laughs. ‘It is big, but it’s not the biggest. It’s probably the biggest one I’ve seen off the ear lobe. But I’ve seen bigger ones on other bits!’

With full PPE on, Jenny is safely and comfortably installed onto the operating table, where Dr Emma numb her ear with local anaesthetic.

‘Have you got a purple marker pen, are you drawing your lines?’ Jenny asks. ‘I do have a purple marker pen but it’s fairly easy to see this,’ Dr Emma chuckles before making her first incision. 

Slowly carving away, Dr Emma works her way around the massive bulge of scar tissue, carefully cutting it away from Jenny’s skin. 

Jenny says she delighted that she can feel more air flowing by her ear following the procedure (pictured) 

Dr Emma explains how she will remove the keloid via a short procedure (pictured) before referring Jenny to a Radiotherapist for a follow up appointment, to ensure the keloid doesn’t return

‘Some people don’t make this much collagen in a lifetime,’ Dr Emma comments, reiterating the sheer size of the keloid. 

After cutting around the lump, the expert makes the final incision before carefully lifting it off, before showing it to an elated Jenny. 

‘Are you ready to feel about a kilo lighter?’ Dr Emma asks. ‘Oh my God! It’s massive,’ a wide-eyed Jenny says, seeing the dismembered lump held in front of her. 

With a bit more work to do, Dr Emma removes the remaining keloid fibres from the wound left on Emma’s ear, before closing it up. 

Handing Jenny a mirror, it’s time for her to see her ear looking the way it should: clean and keloid free.

With just a few sessions of radiotherapy for her to complete, Jenny leaves the clinic feeling happy and ready to take on the world. 

‘I’m feeling really happy, I must admit it feels a little breezy, I can feel more air flowing by my ear, it’s nice to not feel it on the side of my neck,’ she says. ‘Dr Emma and the team have been absolutely amazing, I’m grateful to them all!’ 

The Bad Skin Clinic resumes tonight at 10pm on Quest Red, available to stream on discovery+

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