Michelle Buteau explains why she tapped Cardi B for her first Netflix special: ‘She is just a Dominican angel on Earth’

  • Cardi B lent her distinct voice to Michelle Buteau's debut Netflix special "Welcome to Buteaupia."
  • The comedian said she wanted Cardi B to voice her introduction because she's a woman that empowers other women. 
  • "I think she is just a Dominican angel on Earth who blesses us with her presence. And so I was so happy she said yes to the dress," Buteau told Insider on Monday, referencing the hit TLC series.
  • Buteau also said the Bronx-raised rapper was a "bada– b—- from New York" that gave the set a distinctly New York City feel. 
  • Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.

As Michelle Buteau enters New York City's Sony Hall in her debut Netflix special "Welcome to Buteaupia," Cardi B's voice reverberates through the room.

"New York, are you ready?" the rapper asks, her voice echoing with each word. "Please welcome Michelle Buteau!"

When asked about Cardi B's involvement with the stand-up special, Buteau told Insider she was "so happy" to have her lend her iconic voice to her special, which premiered on the streamer last month.

"She is just a Dominican angel on Earth, who blesses us with her presence. And so I was so happy she said yes to the dress," she told Insider on Monday, referencing the hit TLC series of the same name.

Buteau added, "I mean, her manager's a fan, which was amazing." 

Aside from the fact that Cardi B has a very recognizable voice, Buteau said she wanted the big-name artist on the special because she's an advocate for other women. 

"I love when people are really for other people, particularly women for women. And I know Cardi's one of those peeps," she said. 

The 43-year-old comedian, who now lives on City Island, in the Bronx, also noted that the fellow Bronx rapper gave the night a distinctly "New York City" feel. 

"I was so excited that she was like, 'Okay. New York City!'" Buteau recalled. "Because I really want it to feel like a New York City night. And who's going to introduce me except for another bada– b—- from New York?"

Michelle Buteau is a comedian.
Netflix

Following her high-energy entrance on stage, Buteau launched into an hour-long set about life as a new mother to twins, her recent project with Jennifer Lopez, and the hilarious moments from marriage to a Dutch man named Gijs van der Most.

The New Jersey-born comedian told Insider that "Welcome to Buteaupia" was "the first time ever where I was like, 'Boom. It can't get any better than this.'"

During the special, Buteau held the audience in the palm of her hand, delivering laugh after laugh. Still, the comedian admitted that her jokes don't always land with everyone.

She admitted to being criticized for some of her jokes and is consistently surprised by which bits lead to backlash. For example, she said one viewer got upset by her jokes inspired by people that fall too much or carry blankets on planes. 

"Obviously you never know what's going to strike a crazy cord with someone, but I don't mind. I mean, that's what it is too, right? [It's] supposed be a conversation for better or for worse," Buteau said. 

"You got to call people out, especially from their microphone," she continued. "It's not even just about being funny anymore. It's about using your voice."

Michelle Buteau is a stand-up comedian.
Netflix

And while comedians like Dave Chapelle and Bill Burr are outspoken critics of cancel culture, Buteau deemed it "necessary" to call people out for their behavior. 

"It's all necessary. Cancel culture also holds people accountable for the s— that they serve, and the stuff that we tolerate, which is great," she said. 

Buteau acknowledged that there's a "peripheral circle that throws a wrench in the movement" when people complain about things like wearing masks to protect others from getting COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

But the comedian said that people's courage to confront powerful individuals about their problematic behavior or speech has been beneficial to society in select circumstances. 

"We're talking about Time's Up and #MeToo, it's just real misogynistic, racist f—ing stuff," she said. "Especially as a man, it's very easy to be canceled and I get it, but I'm also like, well now you have to think twice about your behavior. Isn't that crazy?"

"Welcome to Buteaupia" is available to stream on Netflix. 

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